First aid is an important life skill to have – you never know when you or someone else might need it. Here are eight of the most common injuries that require first aid, and what you can do to help if an accident like this happens:

  1. Sprains and strains
  2. Burns
  3. Cuts and grazes
  4. Bumps and bruises
  5. Nosebleeds
  6. Fainting
  7. Seizures
  8. Choking

Cut/Scrape:

If your child is bleeding, press firmly over the site with a clean cloth until the bleeding stops, which may take three to 15 minutes. Clean the area with lukewarm running water and gently pat dry. If the skin is broken, apply a thin layer of antibiotic ointment, then cover with a bandage or gauze and adhesive tape. If you can’t control the bleeding after several attempts with direct pressure, call your pediatrician or head to a

If your child is bleeding, press firmly over the site with a clean cloth until it stops, which may take anywhere from three to 15 minutes. Clean the area with lukewarm running water and gently pat dry. If the skin is broken, apply a thin layer of antibiotic ointment https://securexps.co.uk/ before covering with a bandage or gauze and adhesive tape. Should you be unable to control the bleeding after several attempts using direct pressure, call your pediatrician or head to a

Burn:

For burns, immediately hold the injury under cold running water or apply a cold, wet towel until the pain subsides. Cover any small blisters with a loose bandage or gauze and tape.

If burns are on the face, hands, or genitals, or if they’re larger than 1/4 inch anywhere on the body, call a doctor as soon as possible. If the injury looks severe, go to the Emergency Room. For a burn covering a tenth of the body or more, don’t use cold compresses; call 911 and cover up with a clean sheet or a blanket to prevent hypothermia until help arrives.

Insect Bite/Sting:

If you’ve been stung or bitten by an insect, there are a few things you can do to ease the discomfort. If the insect left a stinger, gently scrape the skin with your fingernail to remove it without breaking it. You don’t want to use tweezers, as that can squeeze more venom out of the stinger and cause further injury. If you have any difficulty breathing, coughing, or develop a hoarse voice, hives, or swollen lips or tongue, call 911 immediately. To combat itching, apply 1% hydrocortisone cream or a topical antihistamine to the area – but only if the skin isn’t broken or scabbed. If you suspect a tick bite, contact your doctor right away. They may want to test for Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases.

Splinter:

To remove a splinter, start by washing the area around the splinter with soap and water. Then, clean a pair of tweezers with rubbing alcohol and use them to slowly and carefully pull the splinter out. Once the splinter is out, wash the skin again. If you come across a fragment that is hard to remove, leave it for a day or so to see if it will come out on its own.

Sunburn:

If you are feeling dizzy, weak, nauseous, or have a high fever, it is best to go to the Emergency Room. If you only have mild symptoms such as discomfort and redness, you can apply cold compresses and aloe vera lotion. You should also take some ibuprofen. Avoid using creams with petroleum as they can cause infection. When not administered by a professional, these drugs may be dangerous.

Nosebleed:

Sit upright with your head forward, and loosen any clothing around your neck that may be constricting. Pinch the lower end of your nose close to the nostrils, and lean forward while applying constant pressure for five to ten minutes. Do not release the pressure or check the nose for bleeding – this could prolong the bleeding. If the nosebleed is the result of trauma, you can reduce swelling by holding an ice pack against the bridge of the nose after the bleeding has slowed down. However, if the nosebleed persists for more than ten minutes or returns later, call your doctor or go to the Emergency Room to check for breakage.